Tag Archives: meta-analysis

FDA’s proposed smokeless tobacco nitrosamine regulation: innumeracy and junk science (part 2)

by Carl V Phillips

In the previous post, I gave some background about the new proposed rule from FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) that would cap the concentration of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine (TSNA) known as NNN allowed in smokeless tobacco products (ST). Naturally, I think you should read that post, but to follow the scientific analysis which begins here, you do not need to.

Before even getting to the even worse nonsense about NNN itself, it is worth addressing CTP’s key premise here: They claim that ST causes enough cancer risk, specifically oral cancer, that reducing the quantity of the putatively carcinogenic NNN could avert a lot of cancer deaths. Continue reading

Sunday Science Lesson: What is “meta-analysis”? (and why was Glantz’s inherently junk?)

by Carl V Phillips

The recent controversy (see previous two posts), about Stanton Glantz’s “meta-analysis” that ostensibly showed — counter to actual reality — that e-cigarette users are less likely to quit smoking than other smokers, has left some readers wanting to better understand what this “meta-analysis” thing is, and why (as I noted in the first of the above two links) Glantz’s use of it was inherently junk science. Continue reading

Glantz responds to his (other) critics, helping make my point

by Carl V Phillips

Yesterday, I explained what was fundamentally wrong with Stanton Glantz’s new “meta-analysis” paper, beginning with parody and ending with a lament about the approach of his critics who are within public health. Glantz posted a rebuttal to the press release from those critics on his blog, which does a really nice job of helping me make some of my points. I look forward to his attempt to rebut my critique (hahaha — like he would dare), which would undoubtedly help me even more.

Glantz pretty well sums it up with:

The methods and interpretations in our paper follow standard statistical methods for analyzing and interpreting data.

Continue reading

The bright side of new Glantz “meta-analysis”: at least he left aerospace engineering

by Carl V Phillips

Stanton Glantz is at it again, publishing utter drivel. Sorry, that should be taxpayer-funded utter drivel. The journal version is here and his previous version on his blog here. I decided to rewrite the abstract, imagining that Glantz had stayed in the field he apparently trained in, aerospace/mechanical engineering. (For those who do not get the jokes, read on — I explain in the analysis. Clive Bates already explained much of this, but I am distilling it down the most essential problems and trying to explain them so the reasons for them are apparent and this is not just a battle of assertions.) Continue reading