Tag Archives: modeling

The travesties that are Glantz, epidemiology modeling, and PubMed Commons

by Carl V Phillips

I was asked to rescue from the memory hole a criticism of a Glantz junk paper from a year ago. I originally covered it in this post, though I do not necessarily recommend going back to read it (it is definitely one of my less elegant posts).

I analyzed this paper from Dutra and Glantz, which claimed to assess the effect of e-cigarette availability on youth smoking. What they did would be a cute first-semester stats homework exercise, but is beyond stupid to present it as informative. It is simple to summarize: Continue reading

This works in practice, now we just need to see if it works in theory

by Carl V Phillips

The title refers to a classic joke about economists, describing a common practice in the field: Something is observed in the real world — say, the collapse of the Greek economy, insurance prices dropping under the ACA, or people lining up to buy new iPhones in spite of already owning perfectly good old iPhones — and the theoretical economists scramble to figure out if their models can show that it can really happen. In fairness, that way of thinking is not as absurd as it sounds. Developing a theory to explain an observation is good science, so long as it is being done to try to improve our models and thus better understand reality and perhaps make better predictions. Obviously, the ability or inability to work out the model does not change what has happened in reality. Continue reading