Tag Archives: pseudo-ethic

The weakness of ethical thinking in public health: a case study

by Carl V Phillips

I continue to be appalled by what passes for ethical analysis in the realm of THR. This is clearly a symptom of the ethical failings of public health in general. Of course it is somewhat better to see someone actually trying to analyze ethics as compared to the normal “public health” approach of simply making a declarations about what should be done without any mention of what ethical goal they are basing that upon, let alone defending the legitimacy of that goal. The latter is a level of political discourse comparable to the average social media or comments section “debate”. But the attempts at analysis seem only to rise to the level of a freshman term paper. Continue reading

Economic innumeracy in public health, with an emphasis on tobacco harm reduction

by Carl V Phillips

I recently had the opportunity to give a talk at what was basically the wake for the end of the quarter-century run of the wonderful Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars in Health Policy Research program at the University of Michigan. I chose to put together some themes from my work as a tribute to one of the goals of that program, bringing the thinking of serious social scientists into health policy arenas where it is desperately lacking. Alas, most of my fellow alumni focus on engineering a better medical system or medical financing, with few choosing to try to deal with public health (let alone “public health”). Medical practice is obviously extremely important, but not so desperately in need of imported thinkers. Well, at least you have me.

I got some great feedback on this talk making that alone well worth my effort. (Thanks to all my colleagues. And it was great seeing you. We’ll be in touch.) But I wanted to also share what I created more broadly here. The following are my slides from the talk, with some text to explain what is not fully contained in the slides, along with a bit of extra material that was not in the talk. Continue reading

Follow-up on how medics doomed public health – case studies

by Carl V Phillips

Yesterday I posted a long essay, a history-of-science analysis that wove in news events and personal flashbacks (hey, what author doesn’t want to be Kurt Vonnegut or Thomas Pynchon?), about why the public health profession ended up being the hate-filled anti-humanitarian institution that it is today. You will recall that it was ultimately the medics, not the temperance nuts, who were responsible for the downfall of public health. Today a case study, and a bit of a second, that provide some further illustration and some comic relief (there is no other way to play it — it is too absurdly horrifying to present as other than comedy). Continue reading